Experinced BGP Books ?

Hello INEians I have Internet Routing Architectures Sam Halabi but now I feel I want to Buy another higher lvl Book wich I gain more high lvl knowledge & experince So I hope you recommend me Book based on your experince and I will make my choice from your recommendation I hope Good Hearts help me 

 

Thanks in Advance 

Regards 

Comments

  • tmanitotmanito ✭✭✭

    Hello INEians I have Internet Routing Architectures Sam Halabi but now I feel I want to Buy another higher lvl Book wich I gain more high lvl knowledge & experince So I hope you recommend me Book based on your experince and I will make my choice from your recommendation I hope Good Hearts help me.

    HI Khalid, I recommend subscribing to Safari Books Online, $399 USD per year and you'll have access to all of the books. And yes I second what Martin recommends. Here is a blog post of Russ White evaluating his own books (Practical BGP and others): http://ntwrk.guru/evaluating-my-own-books/

    Others also suggests Routing TCP/IP Vol II, it also discusses BGP.

    HTH,
    Tim 

    Hope this helps!

    Timothy Q. Manito

  • Many many thanks to you guys for your help appreciate that 

     

    Martin many thanks to you for you mind help unfortunatelly I am turkish 

     

    current time in " Egypt " 

  •  tmanito thank you man for your  help gonna do that no doubt 

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    Before you get your hopes too high, it's my personal opinion that there's no book on BGP that actually covers real-world BGP stuff. Although I don't consider myself a true expert (due to lack of broad BGP exposure), you may find some useful tidbits in either of my NANOG presentations titled "Lessons Learned from a Small Network Operator". In a nutshell:

    Strictly filter customer routes on ingress, give them a "high" local preference (perhaps 400), and tag them with a community to indicate that they're a customer route.

    Filter peer routes on ingress (give yourself a mechanism to block routes, de-tune routes, etc.), give them a "medium" LP (perhaps 300), and tag them with a community to indicate that they're a peer route.

    Filter transit routes on ingress, give them a "low" LP (perhaps 200), and tag them as a transit route.

    Redistribute your own perimeter routes (i.e. customer/peer/transit-facing links, customer static LANs, etc.) into BGP with a high LP, and tag them as a customer route.

    For BGP customers, giving them customer routes only is now easy: permit only customer routes. Same goes for peers/transits.

    Embrace the thinking that customers have higher LP than peers than transits. Realize that your peers/transits do the same, and you'll understand that prepends aren't nearly as powerful as the books suggest. Learn how to send communities to your transits (as needed) so particular routes get peer-level LP or lower.

    My classic strategy was to tag every BGP route with a community of the form [my-ASN:"ABCDE>, where A=1 for customer, 2 for internal, 3 for peer, 4 for transit. BC=two-digit code to represent what site/POP this route came into BGP. D=0 for normal tuning, 1 for preferred tuning, 9 for de-preferred max. E=0 for equal MED (creates hot potato behavior in neighborhing network), E=1 for manual geographic MED (creates cold potato behavior in neighboring network), E=2 for auto-geographic MED (sets MED equal to IGP metric to best egress point, creates cold potato behavior but results in routing updates during link failure events and other convergences).

  • Hi,

    for me, this is a few books are good to master BGP:


    • Routing TCP-IP by Jeff Doyle Volume I  (1998)
    • Routing TCP-IP by Jeff Doyle Volume II (2001)
    • The Internet and Its Protocols A Comparative Approach (2004)
    • Internet Routing Architectures 2nd Ed (2000)

    Old, but very useful

    Brgds,

    Fay ONIS

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