VTP mode off OR VTP mode transparent ???

Hi Guys,

 

Any idea why Cisco Live says best practice for VTP is to set VTP mode transparent, but why not totally off it?

 

I found below from Cisco doc, looks like no difference between mode off and mode transparent:

In the VTP off mode, switches behave the
same as in VTP transparent mode with the exception that VTP advertisements are
not forwarded.

 

 

Thanks !

Comments

  • Based on what I remember from Brian's ATC Videos that I listened, I think for at least VTP Version 2, there is no option to turn off VTP. the only option is to put VTP in Transparent mode.

  • Assuming you're talking about VTPv2 in IOS, how can it be turned off?

    Thx,
    DSU

    On 19 Jul 2015, at 3:35 pm, nyx01xnyx <[email protected]> wrote:

    Hi Guys,

     

    Any idea why Cisco Live says best practice for VTP is to set VTP mode transparent, but why not totally off it?

     

    I found below from Cisco doc, looks like no difference between mode off and mode transparent:

    In the VTP off mode, switches behave the
    same as in VTP transparent mode with the exception that VTP advertisements are
    not forwarded.

     

     

    Thanks !




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  • i will set it to version 3 and mode off....

     

  • VTP transparent means the switch will accept received VTP packets on a trunk, not enforce/apply thoe on the local switch database, but relay those packets out on all other trunks, if some condisions are matched like my VTP domain (i'm running transparent) is the same as the VTP domain of the switch i received the message from. VTP off means the switch will DROP any received VTP messages received on trunks where VTP is disabled.

    So this means that if you have SW1----SW2-----SW3 connected like that with trunks and you want VTP messages sent by SW3 to change/affect SW1, you CANNOT disable VTP on SW2's trunks to SW1 and SW3.

    That's the difference.

  • Thank you Christian for your explanation. Would it mean that we can disable VTP oversion 2 in any trunks if we want to do that. but it just will break the connections between them?



    In that case, what would be the command to turn off VTP version 2. Would it be "no vtp version 2".



    Thank you for your time again.
  • VTP version 2 does not allow you to disable VTP; if you want the switch in the middle NOT to foward VTP packets back and forward between its neighbor switches and use VTP v2, make the switch in the middle to be in a different VTP domain than its neighbour switches. I already gave you this answer in my previous post, but differently formated.

  • Thank you Christian for your explanation. Would it mean that we can disable VTP on any trunks if we want to do that. but it just will break the connections between them?

    In that case, what would be the command to turn off VTP version 2. Would it be "no vtp version 2".

    Thank you for your time again.



    On Tuesday, July 21, 2015 6:13 PM, cristian. matei <[email protected]> wrote:


    VTP transparent means the switch will accept received VTP packets on a trunk, not enforce/apply thoe on the local switch database, but relay those packets out on all other trunks, if some condisions are matched like my VTP domain (i'm running transparent) is the same as the VTP domain of the switch i received the message from. VTP off means the switch will DROP any received VTP messages received on trunks where VTP is disabled.

    So this means that if you have SW1----SW2-----SW3 connected like that with trunks and you want VTP messages sent by SW3 to change/affect SW1, you CANNOT disable VTP on SW2's trunks to SW1 and SW3.

    That's the difference.



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  • Hi Christian,

    Thank you very much for your time. I had heard this in Brian's video when this question was originally asked but I was not %100 sure. I could not remember which video was it to listen to it again. I am glad that you confirmed the same thing. that shows my memory is good enough to handle CCIE materials over time, :)

     

    Thanks again,

     

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