Motivation - where are you?

Hi Guys,

As all of you I'm trying to get the glorified ceritifcation with thos numbers you oh so want to put in your signature :)

 

Do you have any pointers on how to keep yourself motivated? 

I've passed my CCNA a while back ago in 2008 - then started to work for tech companies and had to stop the learining for other job related stuff, different technologies and diffrent brands of networking gear. 

A lot of times you want to have all cisco stuff at work but becuase of 10 years of tweaking people went with juniper, aruba, netscreens and what not - it's overwhelming and I find myself strugling to keep up with all the data and info. 

I thought about recertifying my CCNA then going to CCNP and then CCIE - should I do that or just go with CCIE (I'm referring to R&S). 

Saving a few $$$ appeals to me and if possible I would prefer to go straight to CCIE...

 

How do you keep yourself motivated? When there's work stuff you need to learn and family and friends, house and dogs on your schedule? 

Comments

  • I highley recommend going the CCNA, CCNP then CCIE route. 

    This will help solidify the topics and make the CCIE more approachable. The poccess will also help you improve your study habits and practices. The CCIE takes a lot and you better be good at studying or you will sink quick.

    Lastley the CCIE is a long journey that not a lot of people come out the other end of. If you go the CCNA and CCNP route you will at least have those certs to fall back on as you are working towards your CCIE.

  • I agree, I originally started out for CCIE when I met a CCIE. He asked if I had heard of INE or Brian McGahan, at the time I had heard but didn't follow them, I was a CBT Nuggets user. I bombed my first CCNA exam, met a CCIE and since August 2012 I have been a dedicated follower of INE. CCNA, CCNP, CCIE written and as June approaches, eventually the lab. 

    I had a bunch of knowledge gaps by jumping straight into CCIE, I was in way over my head, I knocked out CCNA/NP/NA Security. Per a few others here on the IEOC I went through the CCIP (CCNP SP) to learn BGP and MPLS. 

    It is a true fact that many that start their CCIE journey fall well short of it, CCNA/NP definitely helped get into a groove to study, research, troubleshoot and most importantly learn what not do: stay off Facebook and YoutTube lol. While I'm at work and i have free time I'm reading the config guides/command ref on everything on the blueprint that I don't know off the top of my head. When I get home I lab them up, config, verify, break and see what working/broken looks like.

    Everybody is different in their approach, I prefer to learn the technology fundamentatlly then get it working and then add features to see how things interact. 

    I have been going through Cisco 360 v5 full scale labs the past few weeks. 

    I realize your just getting started again but I thought a quick 2 year snapshot might be useful. 

    Good luck 
    HTH
    Rob


    On Thursday, January 8, 2015 1:34 PM, that1guy15 <[email protected]> wrote:


    I highley recommend going the CCNA, CCNP then CCIE route. 

    This will help solidify the topics and make the CCIE more approachable. The poccess will also help you improve your study habits and practices. The CCIE takes a lot and you better be good at studying or you will sink quick.

    Lastley the CCIE is a long journey that not a lot of people come out the other end of. If you go the CCNA and CCNP route you will at least have those certs to fall back on as you are working towards your CCIE.



    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx


  • So I forgot to mention, I still do work with cisco gear on daily basis I just didn't certify myself - should I still go through that path? I'm pretty sure I can pass the exams... I would say my knowledge is on a CCNP level (I've designed, built and optimized networks for a while now) - I just didn't have the budget to go pay for every cert...

    On Thu, Jan 8, 2015 at 11:35 AM, that1guy15 <[email protected]> wrote:

    I highley recommend going the CCNA, CCNP then CCIE route. 

    This will help solidify the topics and make the CCIE more approachable. The poccess will also help you improve your study habits and practices. The CCIE takes a lot and you better be good at studying or you will sink quick.

    Lastley the CCIE is a long journey that not a lot of people come out the other end of. If you go the CCNA and CCNP route you will at least have those certs to fall back on as you are working towards your CCIE.



    --
    View this message online at: http://ieoc.com/forums/p/31491/251145.aspx#251145

    Best Regards,
    Michael Lakav

  • That's really helpful, Rob! 
    I appreciate it! 

    I guess I'll have to see if I can walk the walk and not just talk the talk - I'll register for a CCNA test and then the CCNP test - I should be able to pass them :) 
    Just figured I'll save a few dollars... 

    I guess you guys are telling me stuff that I was saying for myself for a while now

    thanks again 

    On Thu, Jan 8, 2015 at 11:54 AM, rriker <[email protected]> wrote:
    I agree, I originally started out for CCIE when I met a CCIE. He asked if I had heard of INE or Brian McGahan, at the time I had heard but didn't follow them, I was a CBT Nuggets user. I bombed my first CCNA exam, met a CCIE and since August 2012 I have been a dedicated follower of INE. CCNA, CCNP, CCIE written and as June approaches, eventually the lab. 

    I had a bunch of knowledge gaps by jumping straight into CCIE, I was in way over my head, I knocked out CCNA/NP/NA Security. Per a few others here on the IEOC I went through the CCIP (CCNP SP) to learn BGP and MPLS. 

    It is a true fact that many that start their CCIE journey fall well short of it, CCNA/NP definitely helped get into a groove to study, research, troubleshoot and most importantly learn what not do: stay off Facebook and YoutTube lol. While I'm at work and i have free time I'm reading the config guides/command ref on everything on the blueprint that I don't know off the top of my head. When I get home I lab them up, config, verify, break and see what working/broken looks like.

    Everybody is different in their approach, I prefer to learn the technology fundamentatlly then get it working and then add features to see how things interact. 

    I have been going through Cisco 360 v5 full scale labs the past few weeks. 

    I realize your just getting started again but I thought a quick 2 year snapshot might be useful. 

    Good luck 
    HTH
    Rob


    On Thursday, January 8, 2015 1:34 PM, that1guy15 <[email protected]> wrote:


    I highley recommend going the CCNA, CCNP then CCIE route. 

    This will help solidify the topics and make the CCIE more approachable. The poccess will also help you improve your study habits and practices. The CCIE takes a lot and you better be good at studying or you will sink quick.

    Lastley the CCIE is a long journey that not a lot of people come out the other end of. If you go the CCNA and CCNP route you will at least have those certs to fall back on as you are working towards your CCIE.



    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx




    --
    View this message online at: http://127.0.0.1/forums/p/31491/251150.aspx#251150

    Best Regards,
    Michael Lakav

  • I'm working on CCIE and skipping the associate and professional level certs.

    I had a ccna before like you and actually sat and passed the switching ccnp exam and was prepping for the route exam   years back but now my original cert and the renewal from taking the switching exam have lapsed.

    However,  based on advice from my associates who are CCIEs, I'm not going to focus on going directly for the CCIE now instead of recertifying the lower levels.

    I think it comes down to what you're comfortable with and if it's going to bother you that you didn't get the others.

    For me,  the point is learning and the CCIE provides plenty of motivation for me in that regard.

    My .02.

    Kelly

    On Jan 8, 2015 2:33 PM, "Michael.L" <[email protected]> wrote:

    Hi Guys,

    As all of you I'm trying to get the glorified ceritifcation with thos numbers you oh so want to put in your signature :)

     

    Do you have any pointers on how to keep yourself motivated? 

    I've passed my CCNA a while back ago in 2008 - then started to work for tech companies and had to stop the learining for other job related stuff, different technologies and diffrent brands of networking gear. 

    A lot of times you want to have all cisco stuff at work but becuase of 10 years of tweaking people went with juniper, aruba, netscreens and what not - it's overwhelming and I find myself strugling to keep up with all the data and info. 

    I thought about recertifying my CCNA then going to CCNP and then CCIE - should I do that or just go with CCIE (I'm referring to R&S). 

    Saving a few $$$ appeals to me and if possible I would prefer to go straight to CCIE...

     

    How do you keep yourself motivated? When there's work stuff you need to learn and family and friends, house and dogs on your schedule? 




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx
  • That's where it gets tricky actually (at least for me).

    I thought of CCIE as a balanced 55% discipline and 45% technical battle.

    My problem is that I always gun it through for several weeks (and I mean mid-hardcore way). Books-Videos-Labs-Notes and keep doing it. Then at some point, I started to broke down, jaded, lose a bit of interest. Then stop doing anything. Stop for several weeks (or months), just to realise I have to go back to study. 

    It really is a vicious cycle, one that I don't know how to handle. If you think about it, it'll just took us one small reason to stop studying. Some small flu, some tv shows, some friends, some pets problem, some kids, etc.

  • I feel the same way... How can you study on the weekend when you have to dig a French drain or something ;)

    But yeah I figured I'll just go step by step... A then P then the big CCIE

    I just don't want to pay $300 for a test where they will ask me about broadcast domains and osi model etc...
    Kind of frustrating 



    On Jan 8, 2015, at 5:53 PM, ciscoarc <[email protected]> wrote:

    That's where it gets tricky actually (at least for me).

    I thought of CCIE as a balanced 55% discipline and 45% technical battle.

    My problem is that I always gun it through for several weeks (and I mean mid-hardcore way). Books-Videos-Labs-Notes and keep doing it. Then at some point, I started to broke down, jaded, lose a bit of interest. Then stop doing anything. Stop for several weeks (or months), just to realise I have to go back to study. 

    It really is a vicious cycle, one that I don't know how to handle. If you think about it, it'll just took us one small reason to stop studying. Some small flu, some tv shows, some friends, some pets problem, some kids, etc.




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx
  • If you feel like you need to take the exam to test yourself go for it. If it is financially difficult, it was for me early on, I had to scrape $150 together and then the pressure was on to pass, I would just start studying for the written exam. I had already gone through the v4 ATC and most of the vol1 workbook when v5 was announced. Fortunately INE kicked out some early training on DMVPN and IPv6 FHS. 

    If your set in your job and aren't pressured with certification i wouldn't waste the time or money getting it. I went that path since I do a lot of contract IT/Network stuff, Having the cert is beneficial. I'm hoping once I pass the lab that I'll get picked up by a partner or will get into a big company that needs a CCIE. 

    Right now all I do every night, 7 days a week from 7p to around 11:30p is lab. INE v5 workbook, foundation and full scale labs, Cisco 360 Labs. GNS3 vault.com has a couple v4 labs that are pretty interesting. When I do a practice lab, whether INE, Cisco 360 or something I came up it's every section of the lab. 

    Keep your chin up man, the last thing you want to do is start studying when your in a bad mood.

    HTH
    Rob


    On Thursday, January 8, 2015 7:51 PM, ciscoarc <[email protected]> wrote:


    That's where it gets tricky actually (at least for me).

    I thought of CCIE as a balanced 55% discipline and 45% technical battle.

    My problem is that I always gun it through for several weeks (and I mean mid-hardcore way). Books-Videos-Labs-Notes and keep doing it. Then at some point, I started to broke down, jaded, lose a bit of interest. Then stop doing anything. Stop for several weeks (or months), just to realise I have to go back to study. 

    It really is a vicious cycle, one that I don't know how to handle. If you think about it, it'll just took us one small reason to stop studying. Some small flu, some tv shows, some friends, some pets problem, some kids, etc.



    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx


  • Most people say they want to be a CCIE but they don’t really
    WANT it ... they just maybe want it .. kind of want it .. they want to sleep
    more than they want to be CCIE .. they want to watch basketball game when it is
    study time .. I am not saying completely stop your life ... but you gotta
    REALLY WANT IT ..

    If it was EASY then everybody would do it .. it’s not only a
    test of technical abilities but character .. discipline .. so when you wake up every
    day at 3:30am to study .. you are not only building your technical skills but
    you are building the character you need to succeed.. “talents and skills might
    take you places that your character isn’t ready for”

    If you really want to be a CCIE then you gotta bring it DAY
    IN and DAY OUT .. there is no taking a break .. there is no day off .. “CCIE
    has been sort of like a light switch in my brain that I have been turning on
    and off and this time I am rewiring this light switch directly into the main grid
    and it's staying on ... constant.”

     You gotta dream about it .. you gotta sleep it .. you gotta
    eat it .. drink it .. and make sure that the 86400 seconds every day is planned
    right ... very deliberately .. and carefully planned ..

     Don't think about how many days you've been studying .. dont
    think about how many hours of labs you've done ... don't worry about the price
    you gotta pay . you just do .. "successful people don't count the cost
    .." ... you just study as long as it takes .. wake up as early as it takes
    .. do as many hours of lab as it takes .. "you dont count the cost on this
    one .. "

    You gotta really dig deep and figure out why it is that you
    want to be a CCIE .. because it’s a grueling journey and you gotta find that
    WHY .... and that WHY .. the reason .. will carry you .. and give you that
    extra energy you need when you are so damn tired to read another page .. to do
    another lab .. to do another chapter ...

    The person you become through the CCIE journey is much more
    important the digits itself ..

    "a lot of people got dreams and goals but when you wake up in the morning what kind of effort are you putting forth?"

    Wish you all the best!!

     

     

     

  • JoeMJoeM ✭✭✭

    My problem is that I always gun it through for several weeks (and I mean mid-hardcore way). Books-Videos-Labs-Notes and keep doing it. Then at some point, I started to broke down, jaded, lose a bit of interest. Then stop doing anything. Stop for several weeks (or months), just to realise I have to go back to study. 


    It really is a vicious cycle, one that I don't know how to handle. If you think about it, it'll just took us one small reason to stop studying. Some small flu, some tv shows, some friends, some pets problem, some kids, etc.

    Isn't this life in general?
    Tortoise-and-the-Hare. Be the tortoise. Be steady and consistent.

    That has been one of the lessons for me during the CCIE journey. There have been a couple of times that I have lost my inspiration to finish.  I especially felt this way after my first failed lab attempt (v4), which was followed by confusion regarding the release of v5 materials (all vendors).

    During these times it is probably important to restate your personal goal(s) and tell your close friends. Your good friends will help motivate you.  Just a thought.

     

    Also, it is okay to take frequent mental breaks to refresh our energy -- but stopping "for several weeks (or months)" is IMO criminal towards any individual's goals, regardless of the subject matter.  

    There is a reason they call it a "journey".  Hope this inspires you.  ;-)

     

     

  • I study on the weekends because my family knows that the process to become a CCIE has an ending. Plus I don't have 8 hours during the week to dedicate to a full lab. I work full time, study throughout the day with fundamentals I'm not familiar with and reinforce in the evening. I like networking and it does pay well. 

    I had a chat with my dad about 15 years ago, right before I graduated from high school, he asked me what I wanted to with my life. I didn't know, I thought I wanted to be Army Special Forces or a Navy SEAL. I've met and worked out both in the past and found out quickly that I couldn't cut it. I took computer classes in high school, mostly programming and hardware stuff, I think I am about the same age as Brian. I thought I had the right idea to just go to work right after school was finished, it took me 11 years to get into college. I was introduced to certification, 8 months later I met a CCIE. He used INE to earn his CCIE. 

    I've always been into technology, it just took me a long time to find something I really like. I don't consider what I do work, I consider it more experience that I can take to the next project. Once I talked to the CCIE for a bit while he was helping us with an upgrade, I was amazed at his CLI speed and understanding. I was introduced to INE that night, like I mentioned before, I've been with them ever since. Part of why I keep this pace up is because people like the CCIE I met and Brian, I was hungry for that level of understanding. I don't think I'll ever be as sharp as Brian or the other CCIE, they set a bar that became my goal to reach. 

    HTH
    Rob




    On Thursday, January 8, 2015 8:42 PM, scorpio200785 <[email protected]> wrote:


    Most people say they want to be a CCIE but they don’t really
    WANT it ... they just maybe want it .. kind of want it .. they want to sleep
    more than they want to be CCIE .. they want to watch basketball game when it is
    study time .. I am not saying completely stop your life ... but you gotta
    REALLY WANT IT ..

    If it was EASY then everybody would do it .. it’s not only a
    test of technical abilities but character .. discipline .. so when you wake up every
    day at 3:30am to study .. you are not only building your technical skills but
    you are building the character you need to succeed.. “talents and skills might
    take you places that your character isn’t ready for”

    If you really want to be a CCIE then you gotta bring it DAY
    IN and DAY OUT .. there is no taking a break .. there is no day off .. “CCIE
    has been sort of like a light switch in my brain that I have been turning on
    and off and this time I am rewiring this light switch directly into the main grid
    and it's staying on ... constant.”


     You gotta dream about it .. you gotta sleep it .. you gotta
    eat it .. drink it .. and make sure that the 86400 seconds every day is planned
    right ... very deliberately .. and carefully planned ..


     Don't think about how many days you've been studying .. dont
    think about how many hours of labs you've done ... don't worry about the price
    you gotta pay . you just do .. "successful people don't count the cost
    .." ... you just study as long as it takes .. wake up as early as it takes
    .. do as many hours of lab as it takes .. "you dont count the cost on this
    one .. "


    You gotta really dig deep and figure out why it is that you
    want to be a CCIE .. because it’s a grueling journey and you gotta find that
    WHY .... and that WHY .. the reason .. will carry you .. and give you that
    extra energy you need when you are so damn tired to read another page .. to do
    another lab .. to do another chapter ...


    The person you become through the CCIE journey is much more
    important the digits itself ..

    "a lot of people got dreams and goals but when you wake up in the morning what kind of effort are you putting forth?"

    Wish you all the best!!

     

     

     



    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx


  • Guys!
    I'm overwhelmed with the amount of encouraging comments! Thanks a lot! 
    I do have a lot of thinking to do... I know I can do it! 

    I'll have to figure out if I want to go for the CCIE right away or do the traditional way 

    I'll be I touch :-) 

    Thanks again everyone! 



    On Jan 8, 2015, at 7:06 PM, JoeM <[email protected]> wrote:

    imageciscoarc:

    My problem is that I always gun it through for several weeks (and I mean mid-hardcore way). Books-Videos-Labs-Notes and keep doing it. Then at some point, I started to broke down, jaded, lose a bit of interest. Then stop doing anything. Stop for several weeks (or months), just to realise I have to go back to study. 


    It really is a vicious cycle, one that I don't know how to handle. If you think about it, it'll just took us one small reason to stop studying. Some small flu, some tv shows, some friends, some pets problem, some kids, etc.

    Isn't this life in general?
    Tortoise-and-the-Hare. Be the tortoise. Be steady and consistent.

    That has been one of the lessons for me during the CCIE journey. There have been a couple of times that I have lost my inspiration to finish.  I especially felt this way after my first failed lab attempt (v4) and then followed by the confusion regarding the release of v5 materials (all vendors). During these times it is probably important to restate your personal goal(s) and tell your close friends. Your good friends will help motivate you.  Just a thought.

     

    Also, it is okay to take frequent mental breaks to refresh our energy -- but stopping "for several weeks (or months)" is IMO criminal towards any individual's goals, regardless of the subject matter.  

    There is a reason they call it a "journey".  Hope this inspires you.  ;-)

     

     




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx
  • I know you are being a bit hyperbolic but, I think a solid measured approach is much more sustainable than the "they want to sleep more than...CCIE" mentality.

    Life is about balance and healthy study habits require that you have that balance. Read some research or guides on studying. The best approach is to leverage primacy and recency by taking short (5 - 10 min) breaks after 15 to 20 mins of study. Sure, study for hours, but give yourself a break so mentally you can process and integrate what you've learned. Rote memorization is one of the more basic forms of learning. Synthesis and integration take time. Whether it's by studying consistently for years or working on the equipment daily and focusing study on areas you don't touch routinely, it's all about time in one way or another. Intensity is good, but it's not the big goal in my opinion.  Consistency wins.

    Study smart AND hard.

    Again, just my opinion.

    On Jan 8, 2015 9:44 PM, "scorpio200785" <[email protected]> wrote:

    Most people say they want to be a CCIE but they don’t really
    WANT it ... they just maybe want it .. kind of want it .. they want to sleep
    more than they want to be CCIE .. they want to watch basketball game when it is
    study time .. I am not saying completely stop your life ... but you gotta
    REALLY WANT IT ..

    If it was EASY then everybody would do it .. it’s not only a
    test of technical abilities but character .. discipline .. so when you wake up every
    day at 3:30am to study .. you are not only building your technical skills but
    you are building the character you need to succeed.. “talents and skills might
    take you places that your character isn’t ready for”

    If you really want to be a CCIE then you gotta bring it DAY
    IN and DAY OUT .. there is no taking a break .. there is no day off .. “CCIE
    has been sort of like a light switch in my brain that I have been turning on
    and off and this time I am rewiring this light switch directly into the main grid
    and it's staying on ... constant.”

     You gotta dream about it .. you gotta sleep it .. you gotta
    eat it .. drink it .. and make sure that the 86400 seconds every day is planned
    right ... very deliberately .. and carefully planned ..

     Don't think about how many days you've been studying .. dont
    think about how many hours of labs you've done ... don't worry about the price
    you gotta pay . you just do .. "successful people don't count the cost
    .." ... you just study as long as it takes .. wake up as early as it takes
    .. do as many hours of lab as it takes .. "you dont count the cost on this
    one .. "

    You gotta really dig deep and figure out why it is that you
    want to be a CCIE .. because it’s a grueling journey and you gotta find that
    WHY .... and that WHY .. the reason .. will carry you .. and give you that
    extra energy you need when you are so damn tired to read another page .. to do
    another lab .. to do another chapter ...

    The person you become through the CCIE journey is much more
    important the digits itself ..

    "a lot of people got dreams and goals but when you wake up in the morning what kind of effort are you putting forth?"

    Wish you all the best!!

     

     

     




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx

  • No one knows where you site like you do. Run through the OCGs and prep for the written. That should give you a good feel for where you sit. 

  • Lots of good advice above.  Keep in mind that every situation is different and you must evaluate using your own situation.  As far as the path to CCIE, if you have had a CCNA in the past and are working on Cisco equipment in your job, then passing the CCNA R&S again should not be a big deal.  If you feel the money is an issue, and you do not need the certs for your current job, then only pay for the CCIE R&S testing.  The CCNA & CCNP material are good for the learning progression, as most CCIE material assumes you already know those levels of knowledge. 

    Motivation is a big factor.  I have recently let the Holidays mess me up, so have to get back in the saddle. [:)]  Keep in mind what Dr. Burns says about the body and learning; your mind subconciously will try to avoid stress, and deep learning this type of information is not fun.  So, the concious mind must make the body do what it does not want to do. This is so you can stay focused and keep on doing the long term studies the CCIE requires.  It is also why most training programs and plans tell you to get a partner and to tell your family and friends what you are doing.  They are to help reinforce your efforts to keep on track. 

    As stated above, if it was easy more people would do it.  My best wishes to all that are working through these things to achieve the goal!  To me the best motivation is the "why" you are doing this in the first place.   

  • I agree completely. Well and succinctly said.

    In response to your final sentence and to re-focus on the why, as opposed to the how. . .

    My motivation is purely to learn and advance my skill set. I think the process and goal of CCIE provides a focused path to that while also allowing me to earn a tangible and verifiable proof of expertise at the end of the day. 

    One thing I can say is, don't let others dissuade you from your goals. I worked for Cisco for about 8 years and, fresh off my CCNA, I entered the door with the goal of earning my CCNP, CCIE within two years. I worked in a system test organization that focused on VoIP for those first 3 years and, almost immediately, I was discouraged from pursuing a CCIE. The argument was that it wasn't needed in our org and I would be spending time studying for something that I would never use. 

    My big mistake was letting my peers talk me out of my personal goal. I lost my true motivation for pursuing the goal - to learn and grow in a subject for which I have a natural and passionate interest. I went on to work on many different projects and products over the course of those 8 years. Many of those roles would have been much easier if I'd followed through on my goal. 

    So, for me, the biggest factor for my eventual success will be maintaining my focus on "why". Well, that and time management :) My new company is in start-up mode and I'm the only dedicated networking person managing 7 global datacenter networks. Good for my continued foundation building and the occasional new technology (I recently setup DMVPN multi-point with IPSec between all the sites for our management network and have been doing a lot of customer aggregation work between customer VPNs (with private and public network ranges) and our own internal protected networks. It's been interesting and a learning experience, but it does present a challenge when finding time for study and blabbing. However, that's not a bad problem to have and probably why, for me, focusing on consistency of study will be priority one.

    Sorry for the (several) long post(s). The subject was at the front of my thoughts lately and I figured I might as well come out of lurk mode to chime in. Thanks to the OP for the post.

    Kelly

    On Fri, Jan 9, 2015 at 10:36 AM, hkeeter <[email protected]> wrote:

    Lots of good advice above.  Keep in mind that every situation is different and you must evaluate using your own situation.  As far as the path to CCIE, if you have had a CCNA in the past and are working on Cisco equipment in your job, then passing the CCNA R&S again should not be a big deal.  If you feel the money is an issue, and you do not need the certs for your current job, then only pay for the CCIE R&S testing.  The CCNA & CCNP material are good for the learning progression, as most CCIE material assumes you already know those levels of knowledge. 

    Motivation is a big factor.  I have recently let the Holidays mess me up, so have to get back in the saddle. Smile  Keep in mind what Dr. Burns says about the body and learning; your mind subconciously will try to avoid stress, and deep learning this type of information is not fun.  So, the concious mind must make the body do what it does not want to do. This is so you can stay focused and keep on doing the long term studies the CCIE requires.  It is also why most training programs and plans tell you to get a partner and to tell your family and friends what you are doing.  They are to help reinforce your efforts to keep on track. 

    As stated above, if it was easy more people would do it.  My best wishes to all that are working through these things to achieve the goal!  To me the best motivation is the "why" you are doing this in the first place.   




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx

  • Ha, should have been labbing and not blabbing. Though I suppose blabbing is accurate too :)

    On Fri, Jan 9, 2015 at 12:39 PM, Kelly Netterville <[email protected]> wrote:
    I agree completely. Well and succinctly said.

    In response to your final sentence and to re-focus on the why, as opposed to the how. . .

    My motivation is purely to learn and advance my skill set. I think the process and goal of CCIE provides a focused path to that while also allowing me to earn a tangible and verifiable proof of expertise at the end of the day. 

    One thing I can say is, don't let others dissuade you from your goals. I worked for Cisco for about 8 years and, fresh off my CCNA, I entered the door with the goal of earning my CCNP, CCIE within two years. I worked in a system test organization that focused on VoIP for those first 3 years and, almost immediately, I was discouraged from pursuing a CCIE. The argument was that it wasn't needed in our org and I would be spending time studying for something that I would never use. 

    My big mistake was letting my peers talk me out of my personal goal. I lost my true motivation for pursuing the goal - to learn and grow in a subject for which I have a natural and passionate interest. I went on to work on many different projects and products over the course of those 8 years. Many of those roles would have been much easier if I'd followed through on my goal. 

    So, for me, the biggest factor for my eventual success will be maintaining my focus on "why". Well, that and time management :) My new company is in start-up mode and I'm the only dedicated networking person managing 7 global datacenter networks. Good for my continued foundation building and the occasional new technology (I recently setup DMVPN multi-point with IPSec between all the sites for our management network and have been doing a lot of customer aggregation work between customer VPNs (with private and public network ranges) and our own internal protected networks. It's been interesting and a learning experience, but it does present a challenge when finding time for study and blabbing. However, that's not a bad problem to have and probably why, for me, focusing on consistency of study will be priority one.

    Sorry for the (several) long post(s). The subject was at the front of my thoughts lately and I figured I might as well come out of lurk mode to chime in. Thanks to the OP for the post.

    Kelly

    On Fri, Jan 9, 2015 at 10:36 AM, hkeeter <[email protected]> wrote:

    Lots of good advice above.  Keep in mind that every situation is different and you must evaluate using your own situation.  As far as the path to CCIE, if you have had a CCNA in the past and are working on Cisco equipment in your job, then passing the CCNA R&S again should not be a big deal.  If you feel the money is an issue, and you do not need the certs for your current job, then only pay for the CCIE R&S testing.  The CCNA & CCNP material are good for the learning progression, as most CCIE material assumes you already know those levels of knowledge. 

    Motivation is a big factor.  I have recently let the Holidays mess me up, so have to get back in the saddle. Smile  Keep in mind what Dr. Burns says about the body and learning; your mind subconciously will try to avoid stress, and deep learning this type of information is not fun.  So, the concious mind must make the body do what it does not want to do. This is so you can stay focused and keep on doing the long term studies the CCIE requires.  It is also why most training programs and plans tell you to get a partner and to tell your family and friends what you are doing.  They are to help reinforce your efforts to keep on track. 

    As stated above, if it was easy more people would do it.  My best wishes to all that are working through these things to achieve the goal!  To me the best motivation is the "why" you are doing this in the first place.   




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx



  • My motivation has been to know more about the technologies than my co-workers.  I could learn about them on my own, without getting a certification, but I use the certification as a tool to measure what I’ve learned and also as a reward.  I feel proud of myself when I pass a test and I can put the letters behind my name.  Maybe that’s selfish and egotist, but that has enabled me to learn more, then when I learn more, I remember, “oh yeah, that’s why I love this job,  it’s pretty cool to make this stuff work the way it’s supposed to, and to fix things that other people  can’t fix”.  It’s a sense of pride in my position in my workplace and being able to help people.  That in turn has indirectly caused me to move up in my company and make more money and be able to provide a good way of life for my wife and children.  Those are all my motivations.  It’s kind of a cycle, (or maybe a wheel, and I’m the rat chasing the cheese, J).  I’ve been pursuing the CCIE for a long time, but I know that just the pursuit  in itself has improved my ability to perform at my job, the pursuit of knowledge.  It’s also not a bad group of people to be friends with either! 

     

    In my personal journey way back in 2000, I got the CCNA,  and let it lapse and then got the CCNA again and then the CCNP.   I was advised, if I wanted to get the CCIE, that I should go up the ladder, because they build on each other and I think that was good advice.  It does get expensive and I’ve financed most of my education and testing on my own. I think it’s a good investment.  No one at work told me to get the certification, so a lot of people think I’m weird to keep pursuing certifications when there’s no direct reward in doing so.  I guess I have a sense of pride that I want to be an expert in my field.  I don’t really think of it as a job.  I think of it more as a hobby.   I think people in our field are lucky to do something that we love so much.  Now, that’s today… ask me tonight at 2am when I’m muttering to myself “I hate this crap.  Why the hell isn’t this thing working right?”  hahahahah…..

     

    From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Michael.L
    Sent: Thursday, January 08, 2015 5:48 PM
    To: Hagen, Ken
    Subject: O365 EOP thinks this is SPAM - Re: [CCIE R&S General] Motivation - where are you?

     

    That's really helpful, Rob! 

    I appreciate it! 

     

    I guess I'll have to see if I can walk the walk and not just talk the talk - I'll register for a CCNA test and then the CCNP test - I should be able to pass them :) 

    Just figured I'll save a few dollars... 

     

    I guess you guys are telling me stuff that I was saying for myself for a while now

     

    thanks again 

     

    On Thu, Jan 8, 2015 at 11:54 AM, rriker <[email protected]> wrote:

    I agree, I originally started out for CCIE when I met a CCIE. He asked if I had heard of INE or Brian McGahan, at the time I had heard but didn't follow them, I was a CBT Nuggets user. I bombed my first CCNA exam, met a CCIE and since August 2012 I have been a dedicated follower of INE. CCNA, CCNP, CCIE written and as June approaches, eventually the lab. 

     

    I had a bunch of knowledge gaps by jumping straight into CCIE, I was in way over my head, I knocked out CCNA/NP/NA Security. Per a few others here on the IEOC I went through the CCIP (CCNP SP) to learn BGP and MPLS. 

     

    It is a true fact that many that start their CCIE journey fall well short of it, CCNA/NP definitely helped get into a groove to study, research, troubleshoot and most importantly learn what not do: stay off Facebook and YoutTube lol. While I'm at work and i have free time I'm reading the config guides/command ref on everything on the blueprint that I don't know off the top of my head. When I get home I lab them up, config, verify, break and see what working/broken looks like.

     

    Everybody is different in their approach, I prefer to learn the technology fundamentatlly then get it working and then add features to see how things interact. 

     

    I have been going through Cisco 360 v5 full scale labs the past few weeks. 

     

    I realize your just getting started again but I thought a quick 2 year snapshot might be useful. 

     

    Good luck 

    HTH

    Rob

     

    On Thursday, January 8, 2015 1:34 PM, that1guy15 <[email protected]> wrote:

     

    I highley recommend going the CCNA, CCNP then CCIE route. 

    This will help solidify the topics and make the CCIE more approachable. The poccess will also help you improve your study habits and practices. The CCIE takes a lot and you better be good at studying or you will sink quick.

    Lastley the CCIE is a long journey that not a lot of people come out the other end of. If you go the CCNA and CCNP route you will at least have those certs to fall back on as you are working towards your CCIE.




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation
    http://www.INE.com

    Subscription information may be found at:
    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx

     



    --
    View this message online at: http://127.0.0.1/forums/p/31491/251150.aspx#251150

    Best Regards,

    Michael Lakav




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation
    http://www.INE.com

    Subscription information may be found at:
    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx

    Ken Hagen
    CCIE #56460

Sign In or Register to comment.