EEM

Guys, in the line below, what does the * and " mean ?

event tag 1.0 syslog pattern "Interface Serial0/0/0.*changed.*down"

 

How did you learn the EEM stuffs, its is kind of hard to me save that in my mind....

 

Also I would like to know better about async and sync , can you explain me ?

 

What is the most importante thing to know about the EEM ?

The kind of events ? like watchdog, kron, counter, cli, syslog ?

 

thanks a lot.

Comments

  • Hi Renato,

    Yes, it's quite tough one task to have quick understanding of EEM for a network engineer because of the scripting logic used into it. You can refer to the Cisco documentation for basic understanding. Here is the link:

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/netmgmt/configuration/guide/nm_eem_policy_cli.html

    As far as I understand, (") starts & ends the pattern match and (*) is used where you need to minimize the length of pattern by eleminating the characters.

    You have to understand basic logic of the scripting in order to write the EEM applet. So, just go through the document, I hope you will get some clarity.

    Good luck!

     

  • Guys, in the line below, what does the * and " mean ?

     

    " -- used to quote the command string.

    .* -- . represents any character, * means repeated 0 or more times, together they mean any string. This is regular expression stuff.

  • Guys, in the line below, what does the * and " mean ?

     

    " -- used to quote the command string.

    .* -- . represents any character, * means repeated 0 or more times, together they mean any string. This is regular expression stuff.

  • Yes, it's quite tough one task to have quick understanding of EEM for a network engineer because of the scripting logic used into it.

    To the OP, treat this as useful learning. You're not a programmer, but you are missing out on a lot if you don't know at least basic scripting.

    Imagine if you had to make a change to 500 devices. Would you go and do that manually, or would you use some sort of automation? If I'm paying for a CCIE, I want them to work in an efficient manner - I don't want them to spend hours typing repetitive commands.

    You don't need to know full details of all languages, but you should be able to follow basic logical flows, and you should certainly understand basic wildcards like "*" - those come up in many, many applications. 

    So don't think "I'm wasting my time learning scripting, I want to be a CCIE." Instead realise that this will help make you a better engineer - which is the point of CCIE after all.

  • So don't think "I'm wasting my time learning scripting, I want to be a CCIE." Instead realise that this will help make you a better engineer - which is the point of CCIE after all.

    Yes I agree, it makes your work a lot easier and you don't have to give tons of hours in order to have basic understanding of scripting. I also recommend the CCIE candidates to allocate couple of days for basic EEM & TCL scripting which makes things easier during lab exam & real world.

     

  • I'm in the same boat with EEM.

    Here is a useful link to get started on regexp for eemhttp://wiki.nil.com/Regular_expressions_in_Embedded_Event_Manager_applets

     

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