It's the little things that get you - lab questions, tactics and strategy

So I'm in my final week of preparation and have some questions for you all.

Do you rename VLANs? Take lab task 4.2

Ensure the phone-connected ports using 802.1Q trunking to provide a “Computer Data” VLAN of 12, and a “Phone Voice” VLAN of 11

Would you actually name the VLANs Computer Data and Phone Voice?

Next question, if you're not asked to exclude any IP addresses from the DHCP range, do you do it anyway? I have a habit of always blocking out the the 1st 50 or 100 so I don't have to worry about conflicts with switches and such.

Auto-Provision, do you use it? I've recently started to and find it helps some so I don't have to grab the mac address and phone type. It also allows me to build out my users and set the phone as their device and the user as the owner of the phone and associate them with the DN. Which raises another question, do you associate each user with everything that is their's from the very beginning or do you only do it for the users you absolutely have to? I find it doesn't add that much time and then I don't have to go back and mess with them later.

Comments

  • I would say if you COULD rename your vlan to what is asked for (especially since that change would take you about 5 seconds), I would do it.  If you're anything like me, that stupid little tidbit would rattle around and distract you the rest of the lab.  


    With regards to the IP Addressing, I would go by the same thought process.  The only penalty for 'over configuring' is unfortunately the most valuable asset you have...time.  it would take you 20 seconds to add the excludes and you'll feel confident that nothing is going to muck with effective connectivity later.  On the flip side, every time you eat up 20 seconds...you add to that pool of time that you don't have.  Do the 'extra' 30 seconds of work 30 times...you've lost 15 minutes of tshoot time at the end.


    for the auto provision and end user portion...my process has been to let the devices auto register and tweak as needed.  make sure auto reg protocol is SCCP, create any SIP phones that you need, and let the rest register.  I don't, however, go and do all the device associations if I don't need to.  to do the mobility extras (line assoc, device assoc, etc.) can take valuable minutes away from something else that is needed.


    That being said, like many other things in what we do, follow your process.  have a default set of things that you do on auto pilot?  Don't much with it.   If you have a default set of settings for Service parameters, as long as it doesn't directly conflict something you gleaned from your initial read through, then do it.  Who cares if you don't have GK, if you're standard thing is to set the BRQ flag on the walk through...take the 1 second to set it.  Otherwise you'll take longer thinking about every single click.


    There's a series of good video shorts on You Tube by a Cisco trainer.  One of his comments was 'Don't make major changes during your bomb run'.  You're on your bomb run, you have your coordinates, you have your misson, other than minor course corrections...trust your research and your training.


    Bombs Away Mr. Mitchell :)


    On Thu, Oct 24, 2013 at 8:05 AM, jgmitchell <[email protected]> wrote:

    So I'm in my final week of preparation and have some questions for you all.

    Do you rename VLANs? Take lab task 4.2

    Ensure the phone-connected ports using 802.1Q trunking to provide a “Computer Data” VLAN of 12, and a “Phone Voice” VLAN of 11

    Would you actually name the VLANs Computer Data and Phone Voice?

    Next question, if you're not asked to exclude any IP addresses from the DHCP range, do you do it anyway? I have a habit of always blocking out the the 1st 50 or 100 so I don't have to worry about conflicts with switches and such.

    Auto-Provision, do you use it? I've recently started to and find it helps some so I don't have to grab the mac address and phone type. It also allows me to build out my users and set the phone as their device and the user as the owner of the phone and associate them with the DN. Which raises another question, do you associate each user with everything that is their's from the very beginning or do you only do it for the users you absolutely have to? I find it doesn't add that much time and then I don't have to go back and mess with them later.




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation


    http://www.INE.com



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  • Anybody have links or a channel for these youtube videos?


    Sent from my iPhone. Any typos are the result of its intelligence and not mine. 

    On Oct 24, 2013, at 9:22 PM, michael.thompson <[email protected]> wrote:

    I would say if you COULD rename your vlan to what is asked for (especially since that change would take you about 5 seconds), I would do it.  If you're anything like me, that stupid little tidbit would rattle around and distract you the rest of the lab.  


    With regards to the IP Addressing, I would go by the same thought process.  The only penalty for 'over configuring' is unfortunately the most valuable asset you have...time.  it would take you 20 seconds to add the excludes and you'll feel confident that nothing is going to muck with effective connectivity later.  On the flip side, every time you eat up 20 seconds...you add to that pool of time that you don't have.  Do the 'extra' 30 seconds of work 30 times...you've lost 15 minutes of tshoot time at the end.


    for the auto provision and end user portion...my process has been to let the devices auto register and tweak as needed.  make sure auto reg protocol is SCCP, create any SIP phones that you need, and let the rest register.  I don't, however, go and do all the device associations if I don't need to.  to do the mobility extras (line assoc, device assoc, etc.) can take valuable minutes away from something else that is needed.


    That being said, like many other things in what we do, follow your process.  have a default set of things that you do on auto pilot?  Don't much with it.   If you have a default set of settings for Service parameters, as long as it doesn't directly conflict something you gleaned from your initial read through, then do it.  Who cares if you don't have GK, if you're standard thing is to set the BRQ flag on the walk through...take the 1 second to set it.  Otherwise you'll take longer thinking about every single click.


    There's a series of good video shorts on You Tube by a Cisco trainer.  One of his comments was 'Don't make major changes during your bomb run'.  You're on your bomb run, you have your coordinates, you have your misson, other than minor course corrections...trust your research and your training.


    Bombs Away Mr. Mitchell :)


    On Thu, Oct 24, 2013 at 8:05 AM, jgmitchell <[email protected]> wrote:

    So I'm in my final week of preparation and have some questions for you all.

    Do you rename VLANs? Take lab task 4.2

    Ensure the phone-connected ports using 802.1Q trunking to provide a “Computer Data” VLAN of 12, and a “Phone Voice” VLAN of 11

    Would you actually name the VLANs Computer Data and Phone Voice?

    Next question, if you're not asked to exclude any IP addresses from the DHCP range, do you do it anyway? I have a habit of always blocking out the the 1st 50 or 100 so I don't have to worry about conflicts with switches and such.

    Auto-Provision, do you use it? I've recently started to and find it helps some so I don't have to grab the mac address and phone type. It also allows me to build out my users and set the phone as their device and the user as the owner of the phone and associate them with the DN. Which raises another question, do you associate each user with everything that is their's from the very beginning or do you only do it for the users you absolutely have to? I find it doesn't add that much time and then I don't have to go back and mess with them later.




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation


    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com



    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx
  • Here is the first video - "The Bomb Run" -

    Kevin Wallace has developed a video series as well as mock lab. I think he references the material in this first video.

     

    Jim

  • I'm not changing much at this point. Just filling in a few gaps and honing my techniques.

    I have a lot of things that I just do, like mrgls, xcoders, mtps, and conference bridge stuff. Dial-plan is pretty much standardized at this point. Just spending my last few days tightening everything up.

    I started studying this morning at 5am. Tomorrow will be more of the same. Nothing like cramming in 2 labs a day. :) I think my brain is starting to melt.

  • November 14 for me.

    I study at least 3 days a week right now for 15-17 hours per day. The worst part about studying for 15 hours is deleting all of the progress/configuration to start over. My spine always shudders a bit.

     

    Jim

  • I studied 8-9 hours several days a week with a dedicated day on Sundays.

    I don't mind wiping my rack, it gives me one more chance to get to better. :) When I was working on my R/S I found it really helped me in the lab to do all the basics over and over and over. I configured routers from a blank config hundreds of times, working on kinds of silly things like ntp, dhcp, debugs and show commands.

  • Something else I just thought of related to actual test day, take your own pencils and pens if you are used to using them. I found the selection to be not very good. It was like writing with crayons, pencils weren't sharp and nobody wants to wait for the proctor to sharpen one for you.

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