Vol.2 Lab.4 Ticket.7 - Troubleshooting Best Practices

Hi Folks,

I correctly answered this ticket but I do have a question about the "more appropriate" method to asnwer a ticket. I understand that there may be many ways to solve an issue in troubleshooting or configuaration. Just as long as we don't violate any of the rules or implement a solution that is restricted by the task explicity. However, I would like to play things safe, than sorry and the solution to this ticket seems a bit sketchy.

The ticket ask for SW2 to ping R3's and R5's loopback 0 prefixes with packets set artifically large (1000 bytes). The cause of the issue in the ticket is a frame-relay command 'frame-relay fragment 780 end-to-end' configuration that prevents the total sum of data along with PDU encapsulations from exceeding 780. Therefore, I re-write the command as 'frame-relay fragment 1200 end-to-end' with plenty of upper room for header data. The command needs to be applied to both R3 and R5. This modification solves the issue and I was able to successfully verify.

However, INE's solution is to simply remove the command that is preventing the task from being completed.

What is considered a safer method? An example would be a preconfigured VACL that is blocking IGP traffic transiting the VLAN and adjacencies from forming. I could modify the VACL to permit the IGP data to pass or just simply remove the VACL from the VLAN. Deactivating the VACL seems a bit sloppy and circumventing the intention of the exam.

Another example is authentication (either routing protocol, ppp, etc...). The ticket is asking me to solve the issue and I find out that the authencation between the two devices is failing. Hypothetically, the ticket doesn't say 'don't remove authentication'...it just says 'solve the problem'. I could remove authentication to satisfy the ticket or the task, but is that safe?

I would definitely appreciate anyone's feedback on approach techniques.

Thanks

Mike

 

Comments

  • As a general rule, for the CCIE exam, you should fix/alter a configuration, not remove it.

    Some of the older INE TS volumes are not a good representation of the real exam, as they do things like removing config, or adding large chunks of configuration. 

    Try INE's new large-topology TS labs if you get a chance.

  • As a general rule, for the CCIE exam, you should fix/alter a configuration, not remove it.

    Some of the older INE TS volumes are not a good representation of the real exam, as they do things like removing config, or adding large chunks of configuration. 

    Try INE's new large-topology TS labs if you get a chance.

    Thanks for the reply. I have never tried the new TS labs before. Do they come with workbooks to follow when you sign up? ...or is this completely a different product?

    Thanks,

    Mike

  • Do they come with workbooks to follow when you sign up? ...or is this completely a different product?
    Hi Michael, check this out: http://blog.ine.com/2013/03/05/ccie-routing-and-switching-graded-troubleshooting-labs-update/
  • I followed the link and read about the topic. That's terrific that they have expanded this. I wish there was a way to see blog updates as a headlines in a single page rather than having to back in time. I noticed a lot of great writings are in blogs. Perhaps if they were referenced from the resources page, it would be easy to navigate to specific blog postings.

    Thanks again for the post.

    Mike

  • Hi Michael,

    I don't agree with your solution since "over 1000 bytes" is not a precise statement. 1200 is higher than 1000 of course, what 1400 also is and that case wouldn't work, as far as I understand.

    Just an opinion, I'm just beginning to practice TS labs... Anyway, I'm going for the v5 lab so I don't care about frame relay issues anymore [:P]

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