anybody work for Presidio?

They called me out of the blue, for a job interview there UC practice, passed the tech scrren(thanks to all here) and I have a offer, I asked questions about the projects and the company, but I couldnt find much on glass door or other places.  Any ideas of the culture there?

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  • I do

    Shahid

    On Sep 17, 2012 6:19 PM, "shodown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    They called me out of the blue, for a job interview there UC practice, passed the tech scrren(thanks to all here) and I have a offer, I asked questions about the projects and the company, but I couldnt find much on glass door or other places.  Any ideas of the culture there?




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  • How do you feel abou  them as a company are they doing the right things?

  • Where are you located? What region? I am located in the NYC Tri-State region

    Shahid

    On Sep 17, 2012 6:53 PM, "shodown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    How do you feel abou  them as a company are they doing the right things?




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  • I have been reading the following blog for a while ... and the guy is kind of a big shot with Presidio, I think.

    He is a CCIE R&S ... but much more impressive, he is a CCIE: Storage Networking as well.

    http://www.feeny.org/how-i-prepared-for-ccie-storage/

  • Nice blog looks like he's of the upper mental bracket. 

  • I didn't hear back from enough people, but i took the job anyway.  

  • so its your turn to provide feed back :)

  • I'm wrapping up a current project, but in the next 6-8 weeks I'll be able to answer some questions.

  • Can you share your experiences with Presidio thus far?

    Some folks gave me the impression of sweat shop. How was the work-life balance? Were you pulling off 60+ hour work weeks?

    How do you see it in terms of a place to establish a long term career? Just overall pros and cons from your perspective would be great

  • I work a normal 40 hour week.  I get to work on great projects all big name companines and some no names.   I can't complain salary is great, benifits are okay.  I've already done more here than I have my entire times at other jobs.

  • "Sweat shop" is a relative term.  I know someone who claims he's at a "sweat shop" because then make him really work and put in a solid 40 hours.  He's use to goofing off, facebooking, etc at work and the place he works now he can't do that because they keep him too busy.

    -- 
    Brian Dennis, CCIEx5 #2210 (R&S/ISP-Dial/Security/SP/Voice)

    INE, Inc.

    From: capital_bruh <[email protected]ieoc.com>
    Reply-To: "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    Date: Friday, November 30, 2012 11:23 AM
    To: Brian Dennis <[email protected]>
    Subject: Re: [IEOC JOBS] anybody work for Presidio?

    Can you share your experiences with Presidio thus far?

    Some folks gave me the impression of sweat shop. How was the work-life balance? Were you pulling off 60+ hour work weeks?

    How do you see it in terms of a place to establish a long term career? Just overall pros and cons from your perspective would be great




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.INE.com


    Subscription information may be found at:

    http://www.ieoc.com/forums/ForumSubscriptions.aspx
  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    Seeing Brian's comments above reminds me of my last job.  We were salaried, but our work was blled to customers.  I wouldn't call it a sweat shop by any means, but the billed nature of the work (given that we rarely had long projects - four weeks was infrequent, four or more months was rare) meant it was quite frustrating.  We were expected to hit 40 hours BILLABLE per week, and often expected to be onsite for the duration of the project.  We had an "overtime" (comp) time policy that if we had more than 45 hours of management-directed time in a week, every hour (over 45) worked would earn one hour of comp time.  As we were expected to hit somewhere over 70% billing from a macro level (i.e. once you accounted for training, vacation, company meetings, time spent updating time sheets, research time, idle/bench, etc.), it essentially meant you shouldn't work over 45 hours a week as taking the comp time would impact your macro-level billing numbers.  (It also meant they were probably billing you at overtime rates, but you were only getting comp time at a normal rate).  Some folks might shrug their shoulders at this, but we were often sold to the customer as being onsite for 100% of the project, and travel time would at best be 50% billable.  Then the customers would send us home early, or their equipment would be late to arrive so now we're idle or forced to jump into someone else's project.

    I had a 13-month project with them (largest project in the 28-year company history), and even though we made the staffing needs clear, they struggled to hire the people necessary to do it right.  When they did, I'd have to endure a "people swap", so we'd lose continuity.  Right around the time I was leaving, we had an even more aggressive project to install 475 switches in 7 high schools.  Based on our pricing estimates, it would take three people the whole summer to do the work (once vacations were factored in, it was EXACT for the number of working days we had).  However, they were only willing to commit to giving me one additional person.  Finally, they were willing to give me two, but they wouldn't promise it'd be the same two for all 11 weeks.  Three weeks before the project was to truly start, I gave my notice, and was gone one week before.  My manager had to step in and help turn screwdrivers to get the job done, for the whole 11 weeks if I understand correctly.

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