some general questions on connecting directly and remotely to a router

In Chapter 5 of the CCNA streaming router course it's mentioned that you connect to a router directly from the serial port of a PC to the console port of the router. Do PCs being sold today still have serial ports? I thought they were obsolete like parallel ports and that the only option is USB connections. On my older PCs I had serial ports but at least for me, on my newer one I don't see a serial port at all. So if you don't have a serial port how do you connect directly to a router from your PC?

In the same lesson, it mentions they are telnetting into a machine that is acting as the "access server" and the access server makes these console connections to the devices on their behalf. How does the access server connect to the numerous routers they are accessing? Does it have multiple serial ports ? Does it have a way of connecting remotely over the network via TCP/IP?

Comments

  • In Chapter 5 of the CCNA streaming router course it's mentioned that you connect to a router directly from the serial port of a PC to the console port of the router. Do PCs being sold today still have serial ports? I thought they were obsolete like parallel ports and that the only option is USB connections.

    Full Sized PCs such as towers etc. sometimes have a serial RS232 port. With laptops, forget it! With some vendors you can add them to the laptop configuration when ordering, but usually you cant. Alternative here is to use, USB to Serial adapters. Those ones are available with single port, 1USB-2Serial, 1USB-4Serial and so on. In enterprises you often see complete console Servers which have IP-connectivity at the one end and upt o 48 serials on the other end.

     

    In the same lesson, it mentions they are telnetting into a machine that is acting as the "access server" and the access server makes these console connections to the devices on their behalf. How does the access server connect to the numerous routers they are accessing? Does it have multiple serial ports ? Does it have a way of connecting remotely over the network via TCP/IP?

    The AS (access-server) connects to the numerous devices via numerous serial ports :).

    Here you can see those things, thats a good video for you I think:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvRH32og9l0 

    Lets say the ip address of the access-server is 192.168.1.100 then you can configure it that when you telnet/ssh into 192.168.1.100 at port 10001 a connection is opened to the access-server and the access server sees with port 10001 that it has to open the serial connection to port 1. Telnet/SSH to port 10002 -> serial 2 and so on...

    If its not clear just keep asking! Thats the key to knowledge!

    Regards!

    Markus

     

  • Very good explanation from Markus. Here is a good link regarding the setup of an Access Server on a 2500 series router..

    http://ciscotips.wordpress.com/2006/06/26/configuring-a-cisco-router-as-a-terminal-server/

  • Thanks both of you for your helpful replies. From the video link that Markus gave they mentioned a 2511 router, in qqabdai's link they mention 2509 and 2510 routers. What is it about these type of routers that makes them specifically suited to be access servers- do they have special ports?

    In a picture in the youtube video it shows multiple console connections coming out of the 2511 router. It looks like one giant connector is plugging into the router port called "Async 1-5" sort of the way a parallel cable plugs into the back of a PC's parallel port and then 4 to 5 individual cables running from that connector to the console port of each router. That answers for me the question of how the access server connects to more than one router.

    What is this "Async 1-5" port on the back of the router? Does the Async stand for Asynchronous and is that the same as serial? Does the 1-5 stand for 1 to 5 ports so that this port or card ( I am not sure if it is built in or is an add-in card) can connect to up to five routers via their console ports?

    Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions as these answers really help me with understanding the process.

  • Each of those routers has a special Asynchronous Serial port that uses a 68-pin Octal Cable to plug into the console port of other devices.  The 2509/2510/2511/2512 are the old versions of these, where 2509/2511 have Async and Ethernet ports, while 2510/2512 have Async and Token Ring ports.  The new version is an NM-16A or NM-32A module: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/routers/ps274/products_tech_note09186a00800a93f0.shtml

     

    This is the Octal Cable that plugs into it: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk801/tk36/technologies_tech_note09186a00801c9a10.shtml

     

    Brian McGahan, CCIE #8593 (R&S/SP/Security)

    [email protected]

     

    Internetwork Expert, Inc.

    http://www.INE.com

     

    From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of meirg
    Sent: Thursday, August 02, 2012 4:27 AM
    To: Brian McGahan
    Subject: Re: [ccna] some general questions on connecting directly and remotely to a router

     

    Thanks both of you for your helpful replies. From the video link that Markus gave they mentioned a 2511 router, in qqabdai's link they mention 2509 and 2510 routers. What is it about these type of routers that makes them specifially suited to be access serverss do they have special ports?

    In a picture in the youtube video it shows multiple console connections coming out of the 2511 router. It looks like one giant connector is plugging into the router port called "Async 1-5" sort of the way a parallel cable plugs into the back of a PC's parallel port and then 4 to 5 individual cables running from that connector to the console port of each router. That answers for me the question of how the access server connects to more than one router.

    What is this "Async 1-5" port on the back of the router? Does the Async stand for Asynchronous and is that the same as serial? Does the 1-5 stand for 1 to 5 ports so that this port or card ( I am not sure if it is built in or is an add-in card) can connect to up to five routers via their console ports?

    Thanks for taking the time to answer these questions as these answers really help me with understanding the process.




    INE - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation
    http://www.INE.com

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