CCIP Retirement

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Comments

  • It already works that way.  If you have CCIP currently and you take *any* CCIE level written exam it will re-cert it.  Any expert level written exam automatically renews all your associate and professional level certs.

  • It already works that way.  If you have CCIP currently and you take *any* CCIE level written exam it will re-cert it.  Any expert level written exam automatically renews all your associate and professional level certs.

     

    Yes, you are right Brian for CCIP recertification, but unfortunately it is not for migrating from the old CCIP to the new CCNP-SP. They require us to take two new exams, SPCORE & SPEDGE, and they didn't mention any thing about using the CCIE written exam for migration/upgrade [:(].

  • Why would you want to upgrade/migrate though?  If you already have CCIP then you should already know the topics in SPCORE & SPEDGE minus the IOS XR/XE topics.  If you want to progress further your next logical step should be CCIE SP not CCNP SP.

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    Yes, you are right Brian for CCIP recertification, but unfortunately it is not for migrating from the old CCIP to the new CCNP-SP. They require us to take two new exams, SPCORE & SPEDGE, and they didn't mention any thing about using the CCIE written exam for migration/upgrade Sad.

    First things first: I apologize to those who have been caught mid-stream.  It can't be fun to consider accelerating your studies.

    That said, if you're studying for those exams from books because you have no exposure to the material on a regular basis, will you really be an SP Professional if you pass them?

    With regard to CCIE SP not being a migration/upgrade path for CCNP SP, it's two different leagues (P-level vs. IE-written-level).  Someone who can pass the IE written is well beyond the CCNP SP level anyway.  I'm not one to "approve" of putting "CCIE written" on a resume, but if that's where you're at, perhaps it's what you have to do.

  • Why would you want to upgrade/migrate though?  If you already have CCIP then you should already know the topics in SPCORE & SPEDGE minus the IOS XR/XE topics.  If you want to progress further your next logical step should be CCIE SP not CCNP SP.

    Because CCIP can not be recertified anymore after October 29, 2012. Suppose that I have taken the CCIE-SP written exam before this deadline and passed which will recertify my CCIP for the last time, then I will have three years from then to either:-

    1. Hopefully Pass the lab exam.
    2. Migrate to the CCNP-SP before my CCIP expires if I could not pass the lab exam. This will requires at least two exams, depending on the validity of other CCIP acceptable two exams by that time. So in this case I will be have taken the written + 2 to 4 exams. Why does not Cisco just accept the written for migration and let candidates focus on the Lab exam without interrupt their study by taking 2 to 4 exams in order to migrate before the CCIP expiry? the written should be covering the topics at the professional level and above for an already certified CCIP, so why the candidate take more exams and waste money and time?

    I think Cisco should accept both options for migration: either the SPCORE+SPEDGE, or the written exam, not just the first option.

  • That said, if you're studying for those exams from books because you have no exposure to the material on a regular basis, will you really be an SP Professional if you pass them?

    I completely understand that POV, and share it to some degree, which is why I wouldn't want to take the new SP tests - I have *never seen* any XE/XR equip, let alone worked on it.  I also understand that the tests were old and extremely dated - I was unhappy about how dated the QoS material was, frankly.  BGP is BGP, so very little changed there other than minor junk like the maxumum number of LB'd paths, the IOS defaults, etc.

    In my own case, I was handed an ISP to run several years ago, and my cisco studies help me implement technologies, or better understand the ones we've already got running.  That said, the further I get, the more obvious it is that I really should have completed the CCNP first, and then picked up the other stuff I needed afterwards.

  • Someone who can pass the IE written is well beyond the CCNP SP level anyway.  I'm not one to "approve" of putting "CCIE written" on a resume, but if that's where you're at, perhaps it's what you have to do.

    That is my point. If someone is already CCIP, and then passed the written exam, does not that mean that he deserve to be CCNP-SP? I'm talking about someone who already has the CCIP, not just starting by taking the written exam directly.

    Cisco recertifies your CCSP/CCNP-S if you passed the CCIE voice written exam or even a voice professional level exam. Two different tracks totally. Wouldn't it be more reasonible to migrate CCIP to CCNP-SP by taking the CCIE-SPv3 written exam which is essentially in the same track and higher level?

  • Well, I've made my peace with this.  It bummed me out for a day or two, but I'm over it. Rather than cram for an obsolete and retired cert, I'll move on the the NP.

     

    The remaining gripe I have is that I really *wanted* to learn MPLS, since it's a technology that (AFAICT) is wildly misunderstood, and certainly one I don't understand.  I'll have to postpone it for a while longer, I guess, or maybe attack it in between ROUTE and SWITCH since SWITCH is something else I have almost no day-to-day practice with.

     

    My new plan is to read through the Doyle book(s) in sections, run through the INE CCNP videos, the corresponding ATC videos, and the vol1 workbook labs for each tech.  I understand that there are a few areas of nte NP that don't appear in the IE, for whatever reason - I'll deal with that when it's an issue.  I think for far too long I've been focusing on ow to get things implemented rather than understanding what's going on under the hood, so maybe this is a blessing in disguise.  It's giving me an opportunity to get back to basics, and solidify, or in some areas re-solidify my core knowledge.

  • I think we will make it. Lets get the CCIE and then the possible lost of the CCIP is okay ;)..

    Regards!

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    The remaining gripe I have is that I really *wanted* to learn MPLS, since it's a technology that (AFAICT) is wildly misunderstood, and certainly one I don't understand.  I'll have to postpone it for a while longer, I guess, or maybe attack it in between ROUTE and SWITCH since SWITCH is something else I have almost no day-to-day practice with.

    MPLS is an abstraction technology.  Think of it as layer 2.5.  (For comparison, I think of 802.1q as layer 1.75 and LACP/PAGP as layer 1).

    Start with a network of perhaps 10 routers, partially meshed, with an IGP running amongst them. When you add 'mpls ip' to the links between your routers, you're enabling MPLS forwarding.  As you do so, the LFIB (label FIB) is built, and as you finish, you now have an MPLS network.  Every packet that comes in (assuming it can be routed in some way using the information in your IGP) will have a label added that is used to get the packet to the egress point of your network.  Along the way inside your 10 router network, it will be forwarded by that label, which will be swapped on intermediate routers and popped (removed) either on the egress router or one hop earlier.  In doing so, the intermediate routers completely ignore the destination IP address, hence the reason I call it an abstraction technology (you've abstracted the packet forwarding process in such a way that the destIP is meaningless).

    When you overlay BGP, BGP routes have a "next-hop" parameter that in reality is the "last-hop" or egress point.  Knowing that, MPLS doesn't bother generating labels for BGP routes, since they point to "last-hops" which are in the IGP (and those last-hops do have labels).  This keeps the LFIB cleaner.

    Further, MPLS VPNs take the functionality of VRFs (which technically have no dependence on MPLS), and glue them together by way of an additional label.  An MPLS VPN-enabled VRF has an addtional label tablespace where its labels are kept/managed.  As a packet enters your 10-router network by way of an interface with 'ip vrf forw <blah>', a VPN-specific MPLS label is applied at layer 2.51, and then an IGP-specific label is applied at layer 2.50.  The network forwards the packet using the outer label (at the lower layer 2.50) until it gets to the egress point, where we begin to work our way up the stack: the layer 2.51 label maps the packet into the correct VRF, and the destination IP is now referenced to get the packet out to the correct next-hop.

    Any clearer?

  • Thanks for the summary Peety!

    I actually got about 150 pages in to MPLS fundamentals (*lots* of pictures, so that's probably really about 25 pages of text) and watched the first few R&S ATC MPLS vids before the CCIP was retired.  I think I understand the basic concept of label switching, but I have a long way to go before I could actually implement it on the network I manage.  I'm going to go through the R&S WB1 labs to see if I can get more comfortable with things.  I guess I'll go from there if I want/need to understand more right away.

     

    Thanks again!

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    Implementation is simple: "mpls ip" on all P-P, P-PE, and PE-PE links.  Next question?

    MPLS VPN implementation is a little tougher:

    router bgp ASN

     address-family vpnv4
    neighbor hou-core send-community extended
     neighbor 216.139.69.32 peer-group hou-core
     neighbor 216.139.69.60 peer-group hou-core
     exit-address-family
     !

    Then:

    !
    ip vrf <blah>
     rd ASN:<magic-code>
     route-target export ASN:<secret-code>
     route-target import ASN:<secret-code>
    !
    router bgp ASN
    !
     address-family ipv4 vrf <blah>
     redistribute connected
     redistribute static
     no synchronization
     exit-address-family
    !
    int serial9/9/9
     ip vrf forwarding <blah>
     ip address 1.1.1.1 255.255.255.252
    !
    ip route vrf <blah> 2.2.2.0 255.255.255.0 s9/9/9
    !

  • PhoenixPhoenix ✭✭

    Peety your explanation for MPLS is highly informative. It will help definitely many persons.  I suggest you to write more on this topic in a blog or here in IEOC forums, but in structured way.

     

    Best Regards,

     

  • The diffs between "address-family vpnv4" and "address-family ipv4 vrf" confuse me still, but I'm sure I'll get it figured out once I go through WB1.

  •  

    The diffs between "address-family vpnv4" and "address-family ipv4 vrf" confuse me still, but I'm sure I'll get it figured out once I go through WB1.

    Hi,

    The "address-family ipv4 vrf" is just a speprate routing table & routing processes. Now to carry routes from different multiple VRFs (one for each customer) over MP-BGP, the "address-family vpnv4" is used. An analogy for this is access-links and trunk-links, where the later carries traffic for multible VLANs.

     

    HTH,

    Bassam

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    'address-family ipv4 vrf <blah>' is a means for the VRF to exchange routing information with BGP peers, as well as redistribute other protocols (plus connected/static) into the BGP space; these routes are then "eligible" for distribution over multi-protocol BGP.

    'address-family vpnv4' is the means of label exchange (it's another protocol of multi-protocol BGP or MP-BGP) amongst PE routers.  The routing information contained in various 'address-family ipv4 vrf <blah>' is tagged with a community based on the route-target export command and shared amongst PE neighbors.

  • what happens to those who have both CCNP and IP. Where do they stand?

  •  

    what happens to those who have both CCNP and IP. Where do they stand?

     

    Hi,

    CCNP is not affected. For CCIP, you can recertify it before 29 OCT 2012  for the last time for additional three years. After that, or even starting from now, you have to migrate to the new CCNP-SP if you want to.

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • I was under the impression that if you had both then you then you would automatically be a ccnp sp but i guess that is not the case. Damn, i am going to lose one certification :(

  • If you have the CCIP, there are only two tests to take to get the CCNP SP, I believe - their migration tool was garbage when I looked.  So, rather than starting off with CCNA SP and then all the CCNP SP tests, you just fill in a few gaps.  Of course, this assumes you have access to certain equipment which many people don't and won't w/o rack rentals or similar.

  •  

    Hi,

    When did you pass the BGP & ROUTE exams?! If that was in the near past (last three years or less), then you have to pass only two exams for the migration:SPEDGE & SPCORE.

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • I passed my ccnp way back in 2005 and IP in 2007. Both certs were re-certified recently when i passed the ccie sp exam. Regardless of ccie, i was really proud of my ccip cert as it helped me career wise.

  •  

    Hi,

    If you mean the SP written exam, then I suggest to you if you found motivation, time, and money, to continue to get the CCIE-SP, since this supercede CCIP. During your study for this, you can pass the required exams for the CCNP-SP if you wish to.

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • I recently cleared the lab exam which i realise is a higher level certification but still hurts to lose CCIP when eventually it does go :(

  •  

    Congratulations mate, very well done!. If I'm in your shoes, I will not be worried at all. CCIE-SP is a great achievement. You are far steps ahead of me. I need to migrate while studying for CCIE R&S. Have you any suggestions for me?!

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • thanks mate. If you were studying for SP then yea, i can help out but R&S approach i believe is totally different. I hear loads of people say that SP and R&S overlap each other on several topics but i dont think that is really true. I can write an essay on i why i believe that is not the case.

    Anyways, i dont understand why you are moving away from sp to r&s?

  •  

    I'm just like you before, having both CCNP & CCIP, with R&S is my main focus. So I started stduying CCIE R&S, but got surprised by the new Cert.

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • well good luck with your R&S. If i was in your place than not sure if i would go for ccnp sp as you are aiming for r&s.

  •  

    You might be correct. But I do not want to lose that Cert. In your case, you actaully didn't lose it, in my opinion, because you got CCIE-SP which suprecedes it. CCIE R&S unfortunately does not supercede CCNP-SP.

    Anyway, thanks for help, and I'm waiting for your essay about SP & R&S overlap :).

     

    Regards,

    Bassam

  • I have spoken to ppl who have passed r&s and a yr ago, when cisco decided to change the version of ccie spv2 to v3, it came as a bit of a shock. For the new stuff introduced, there simply wasnt enough info and i started pondering to switch to R&S. I looked at the curriculam and thought, lot of stuff overlaps between SP and R&S. After talking to an R&S guy who attempted and passed the exam advised me against switching to R&S.

    The approach of the exam is totally different, in R&S, they expect you to know the protocols inside and out and know every little trick. Its really geared towards in my opinion (and in the eyes of many) for enterprise networks. Also, as the name suggests in r&s, switching plays major part in r&s as opposed to SP even though they expect you to know it but the focus of the exam is not on switching.

    SP on the other hand is tackled in a different way. Yes, you are expected know your routing protocols very well but the expectation in the SP lab is not to making the routing protocols sing and dance, but to understand how it is typically deployed in a SP enviroment. It is very mpls VPN focused and mpls is something you need to know inside out. In a nutshell, studying and exam stratagies are totally different for both ccie exams and as i was told a yr ago, if i was to switch to r&s, i would need to study 70% extra to be able to give r&s exam. So i decided to stick with ccie sp.

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