Modular Switches 45xx and 65xx families

Hi,

A quick look indicated that fixed-port rather than modular switches are taught/tested for CCNP R&S and CCIE R&S.

Did I miss something?

Are the 45xx and 65xx modular switch families taught/tested under a track other than R&S.

Ernie

Comments

  • The syntax for the fixed switches and the modular switches is the same with a few minor exceptions.

     

    Brian McGahan, CCIE #8593 (R&S/SP/Security)

    [email protected]

     

    Internetwork Expert, Inc.

    http://www.INE.com

     

    From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Ernie_07
    Sent: Monday, December 26, 2011 6:08 PM
    To: Brian McGahan
    Subject: [ccnp] Modular Switches 45xx and 65xx families

     

    Hi,

    A quick look indicated that fixed-port rather than modular switches are taught/tested for CCNP R&S and CCIE R&S.

    Did I miss something?

    Are the 45xx and 65xx modular switch families taught/tested under a track other than R&S.

    Ernie




    Internetwork Expert - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation
    http://www.internetworkexpert.com

  • Ernie,
       As I understand it, the short answer is no.  The other tracks, voice for example, concentrates on the MQC structure of the 2800 routers and of the switching in the 3750 / 3560 switches.  Since these same basic structures can be carried through to other platforms, it's a good base of knowledge.  Since the modular switches have the same basic structures (albeit more options), that same base knowledge can be applied.

    MT

    On Mon, Dec 26, 2011 at 7:07 PM, Ernie_07 <[email protected]> wrote:

    Hi,

    A quick look indicated that fixed-port rather than modular switches are taught/tested for CCNP R&S and CCIE R&S.

    Did I miss something?

    Are the 45xx and 65xx modular switch families taught/tested under a track other than R&S.

    Ernie




    Internetwork Expert - The Industry Leader in CCIE Preparation

    http://www.internetworkexpert.com



  • Hi,

    A quick look indicated that fixed-port rather than modular switches are taught/tested for CCNP R&S and CCIE R&S.

    Did I miss something?

    Are the 45xx and 65xx modular switch families taught/tested under a track other than R&S.

    Ernie

    The biggest difference between the 2 lies in port capacity and switch fabric.  The operating system on the 65xx and 45xx switches may have ADDITIONAL capability over the fixed port, but the will have all the capability of the fixed port.

     

    warjack

     

  • Hi Ernie!

    Yes the switches 45xx and 65xx come into play in other cerifications that the R&S track. In the future there will be the CCIE Data Center  as Cisco announced it at the Cisco Live.

    http://blog.ine.com/2011/07/14/cisco-live-2011-future-of-ccie-voice-data-center-and-overall-ccie-program/

    On the other hand you need knowledge for Cisco Certified Specialist certifications like Cisco Data Center Network Infrastructure Support Specialist.

    You can check them here.

    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/le2/le41/learning_certification_level_home.html

    If you like to know more about he specialist certs, just ask me I already got 6 of em.

     

    Regards!

  • These two switches are usually found in the data center or core room switches since they are really powerful switches.

    With the 65xx with the 2T managment ports you will get 2 TERA bits of data transfere per second. Usually this is for the high end so they usually will only be used in those area.

    For the CCNP track, get a 3560 series layer 3 switch and you will be fine. No need for these units at this time.

  • For the ccmp track you definitely dont need them I agree with that! They male it even more complex as they have a different architecture that is different to understand corresponding to other ordinary switches. For the CCNP I would suggest at least two,better three switches. Depending on your money you can buy 2950s (cheap) or a little better 3550s (medium price with about 100$ each). The 3560s is good when you are aiming at CCIE after the CCNP because it supports Ipv6 for example.

    Regards!

  • The CCNP SWITCH blueprint includes the topic Implementing High Availibilty technologies that run on those modular platforms, such as NSF, SSO, RPR, RPR+.  So you'll have to at least know the concepts.   For CCNP/CCIE R&S lab practice, I agree with the other's comments about using 3550s and 3560s.

    v/r,

    John

  • Thanks for the input guys.  Part of what drove the question was a gig at a firm that had more 45xx and 65xx then I could shake a stick at.

    The electrical work in the wiring "closets" was poorly planned.  They moved a number of 45xx and some 65xx boxes between buildings and/or wiring closets within the same building but on a different floor based on internal demand and one of the hard jobs was finding power cords with correct gender.  One end might fit one of the power supplies in a particular switch but the other wouldn't fit the electrical socket that was free.  Worse yet, because of poor planning, often redundant power supplies were fed via the same circuit, so if a breaker tripped, both supplies died.

    Glad to have confirmation that core configuration will be quite similar if not exactly the same as with the 3560 or 3750.

     

    Ernie

  • peetypeety ✭✭✭

    The 4500s and 6500s are "just switches".  If it matters, you should know the on-module, backplane, and supervisor capacities as they will bite you if you push the box, but the config logic is essentially the same.  I do occasionally find myself doing 'sh ver' to figure out what platform I'm sitting at.  As far as the electrical, that isn't hard, just different.  Certain nuances have to be learned, sometimes the hard way (i.e. 6500 series 4000-watt power supplies must be fed with "high-range" power, 170V-264V I believe.  they won't turn on when fed by 120V power.)

  • Glad to have confirmation that core configuration will be quite similar if not exactly the same as with the 3560 or 3750.

    I would say its to 98% the same. The devil is in the detail. When you get to QoS configuration or when you want to add some features you have to take care that the modules can or cannot! The modules have differences in many categories and even then when you dont think of it!

     

    Regards!

    Markus

  • The 4500s and 6500s are "just switches".  If it matters, you should know the on-module, backplane, and supervisor capacities as they will bite you if you push the box, but the config logic is essentially the same.  I do occasionally find myself doing 'sh ver' to figure out what platform I'm sitting at.  As far as the electrical, that isn't hard, just different.  Certain nuances have to be learned, sometimes the hard way (i.e. 6500 series 4000-watt power supplies must be fed with "high-range" power, 170V-264V I believe.  they won't turn on when fed by 120V power.)

    I am with Peety, they are just switches with lots of ports and you have some syntax differences when entering certain interfaces as you must address it by slot number and port number. Some cool things about these models are redundant PSU's, redundant Sup's, and my favorite, if I have an issue with ports on a line card, I do not have power cycle the whole unit, I can just reset that specific line card module. Also I would say 6500 is more of a core switch than a 4500. We use a 6500 for our core and 4500's for our edge.

  • Hi!

    My opinion on the 4500 is that they also are good core devices especially with the actual new sups and 10g support. But the 6500s have been pushed a lot more in the datacanter world. Redundant sups I usually dont recommend,in my opinion a dual chassis solution is always the best thats because in case of a failure the redundant sup architecture often fails at a complete crash. One real good thing is the software update funcionality. You update the redundant sup, switchover non disruptive and them update the other sup or rollback to the old sup with the validated sw.

     

    Regards!

  • I also prefer the dual chassis design, but I guess it depends on the business requirements and the budget at hand. We use 4500's at the access layer just because of port quantity and the ability to slide in another line card to expand, sure beats purchasing another switch, configuring it, and then uplinking it. 

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