Ether Types you need to remember for your CCIE lab

 PPPoE ==>>   0x8863 (Discovery Stage) or 0x8864 (PPP Session Stage)

PVST ==>> 0x4242

 

 

keep adding to this...hopefully this will become a 1 stop shop thread from where i/you can copy and paste and print out a piece of paper and then thumbtack it to my wall along with the paper with all the QOS formulae

Comments

  • SSTP = PVST+ = 0x10B
    IPv6 = 0x86DD
    IPX = 0x8137

    Certain ether types are available in context sensitive help (?), ie DECnet spanning tree BPDU -> dec-spanning.

    But do you really think that Cisco will test us on this?

  • But do you really think that Cisco will test us on this?

     

    Doubt it. It would be evil if they did

     

  • I also doubt it. Might be good having a link for some common ones but I would not spend time on memorizing them. That time could be spent with more important topics.

  • I agree with Daniel. I doubt it, but we can easily get those in the docCD if needed.

  • SSTP = PVST+ = 0x10B
    IPv6 = 0x86DD
    IPX = 0x8137

    Certain ether types are available in context sensitive help (?), ie DECnet spanning tree BPDU -> dec-spanning.

    But do you really think that Cisco will test us on this?

     

     

    maybe for some sort of layer 2 filtering...(i have not gone thru the security section of WB1 yet)

    i dont wanna know EVERY ethertype...just maybe 4 to 8 of the ones most likely to show up IF they do...4 to 8 of them is not far fetched to remember till you walk into the lab and then quickly type em out on notepad! (thats not cheating..it came from your brain)

     

    if cisco expected us to remember all of them then i might as well get it over with and go apply for a job at EVERY mc donalds in a 30 mile radius [:(]

  • I think it much more likely that they will test your ability to find the necessary information in the documentation. A lot of times you will find that a scenario in the lab is taken almost directly from the documentation.

    Another helpful tip is that they allow you to do content searching via the internet explorer search tools (ctrl + F). So just opening up the full 3560 IOS command reference and search for a keyword like "ethertype" can quickly get you to the sample config snippets and likely tables that include whatever obscure information the test may be looking for.

    For example, you can find several ethertypes by simply looking in the following command reference and searching "ethertype".

    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/catalyst3560/software/release/12.2_52_se/command/reference/cli1.html 

  • Thanks Brandon,

    That is some solid advice. I know a candidate that recently took the lab and he forgot to check the DOCCD for something he didn't know. Turned out the exact scenario was present in the DOCCD when he looked it up after.

    Knowing the DOCCD is a must and your advice to use ctrl + f is very good. I usually look up a lot of stuff in the command reference since I find it to be more verbose than configuration guide and from there we can also find links to the configuration guide if needed.


  • even though people are already used to, they are still the major ones:

    0x0800 (Ipv4)

    0x0806 (arp)

     

    just adding to the list


  • Turned out the exact scenario was present in the DOCCD when he looked it up after.

    I got one task in exam that the solution can be derived from Cisco Doc, same scenario with a little modification. I totally agree with Brandon and Daniel. It's really really important to know how to find things in Cisco Doc. Based on my exp, you should be able to find the info that you need for the exam from Cisco Doc.

    Happy studying!

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